Nisus Writer and technical writing

Everything related to our flagship word processor.
martin
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Re: Nisus Writer and technical writing

Post by martin »

ptram wrote:I discovered another minus to using NWP for technical publishing: EPS vector graphics is rasterized as low resolution images.
This is not true if you insert the EPS graphic directly into a NWP file. I've received the test document you sent to us, and it looks like the graphic rasterization occurs during the ODT import process. Documents created in NWP won't have this problem.

ptram
Posts: 280
Joined: 2007-10-21 14:59:09

Re: Nisus Writer and technical writing

Post by ptram »

Actually, that document was first created in NWP, and then re-read in NeoOffice and saved as an ODT file. The images were then imported again in NeoOffice.

The odd thing is that I just tried again importing the same image files in NWP, and they look perfect. I wonder when the rasterization took place. I'll do some other tests, to see if I can find a pattern.

Paolo

ptram
Posts: 280
Joined: 2007-10-21 14:59:09

Re: Nisus Writer and technical writing

Post by ptram »

Hi,

Five years after my first message on this issue, things have greatly improved in Nisus-land. Today's Nisus Writer Pro is much more powerful than it was at the time.

ToC and Bookmark links are now correctly saved into PDF files. Cross-references can point to ToC entries. Soft hyphens are there, and hyphenation has greatly improved in several languages. Revision tracking and versioning are there. You can add floating frames and linked images are supported (even if with some caveats with non-native RTF formats), and can be opened with a double-click for editing in Illustrator or Photoshop, or other newer, friendlier applications. In addition, kerning and ligatures can greatly improve the text appearance, giving it the needed typographic quality for printed books.

What is still missing from my original requests are flexible variables (to add, for example, automatic running-headers and variable product names) and conditional text (for parts changing according to the document's version - for example, between the Pro and Express version of the same product).

Other things that I'm needing are a way of linking TIFF, EPS and AI images without duplicating them in the document, and (maybe as an alternative) a way of managing different parts of the document as separate documents, sharing the same ToC, Index, master styles and the web of cross-references. I'm also in need of table styles, since my work is heavily filled with tables.

As a personal preference, I would prefer to work on a single, lighter document. At the same time, I understand that workgroups would do better with separate chapters, each assigned to a single member of the team. No application I know, apart for Scrivener, can however make separate documents feel like a single document.

A few years ago it was even funny to look after a word processor as a replacement for a layout processor. But what I'm looking for is a replacement for a "document processor" like FrameMaker – a mix between a word processor and a layout program. While FM has not progressed in these years, NWP has gone on to catch, and even surpass it on several fronts. I don't think it is so impossible to think to NWP as a (better) replacement for FM. Also, with the evolution of self-publishing, I think that word processors can no longer only be text processors, and the old utopia of the inventors of FrameMaker is still alive.

There are a few steps missing to make NWP the perfect "document processor", but I don't know how big these steps would be for the developers.

Best regards,
Paolo

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